August 7, 2010

#98: Unif / Tung-I Chah Chiang Flavor Ramen Noodles

Okay so thought I’d try something with an odd name today. Yes, I thought of the money ch-ching sound too when I read the flavor… It’s a Taiwanese flavor from what I found on Google – spicy and oniony.

Two packets oily gunky stuff and a powdery one.

It looks a bit like a bird poop or perhaps a squished grasshopper – I like that my food today will resemble poo or entrails!

So end product is here. It smelled a little oniony and a little spicy and had almost a coffee smell. Christine identified it as an almost burnt peanut shell aroma. So it tastes a little odd… The broth is kind of thick I suppose and very very dark. The noodles are of a reasonable consistency. The taste? Kind of like dark sludgy water – like you’d expect pond water to be like but tasty. It isn’t at all bad, but not really great. The name is neat. I give 2.5 out of 5 stars.

Products cooked according to package instructions. Product reviews done prior to adding any additional ingredients.

2 thoughts on “#98: Unif / Tung-I Chah Chiang Flavor Ramen Noodles

  1. Sheila

    I was reading your reviews and came upon this one for the chah chiang noodles. My parents are from Taiwan, so even though I was born in the US, I regularly eat Asian food. I just wanted to let you know that these noodles are not supposed to be in the soup, and the dark sauce is not supposed to be in the soup. Chah chiang mein (noodles) are a popular Taiwanese dry noodles dish. I’ve eaten this kind/brand before, and you are supposed to cook the noodles in water, drain them and add them to the dark sauce only. The powdery/onion packet is for soup flavoring. So you basically get a dry noodle dish and a broth soup to go along with it.
    I like to cook the noodles with the soup flavoring in the boiling water. I put the dark sauce in a separate bowl, and when the noodles are done, I just scoop them out (with chopsticks) into the bowl with the dark sauce and mix. If the noodles are a little wet, it helps them mix better with the dark sauce. Then you are left with the soup in the pot with the flavoring already in it, and the dry noodle main dish.
    I just thought you might like to know about the way this ramen is typically prepared/consumed. I enjoyed reading your site, and I hope you continue exploring all the different ramen noodles out there!

    1. Hans Lienesch Post author

      Hi Sheila –

      Thanks for the info! I’ll have to re review this one. I try to read the baxk of every package as to the directions for cooking, but sometimes I forget and stuff like this happens. I can get more easily.

      I’m glad you enjoy the reviews! If you’re on facebook, add Ramen Rater – then you can have the reviews pop up as soon as they’re done up.
      Thanks for your comments!
      The Ramen Rater


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